victoriousvocabulary
victoriousvocabulary:

OPTIPARONOMASIA
[noun]
Neologism: visual punning; a visual play on words; the visual exploitation of multiple meanings of words, or of similar-sounding words, for an intended humorous or rhetorical effect.
Etymology: Greek ‘opti’ (from optikós, equivalent to opt(ós) - seen ) + ‘paronomasía’ (a play on words, assonance, derivative of paronomázein - to make a slight name-change).
[Nabhan Abdullatif]

victoriousvocabulary:

OPTIPARONOMASIA

[noun]

Neologism: visual punning; a visual play on words; the visual exploitation of multiple meanings of words, or of similar-sounding words, for an intended humorous or rhetorical effect.

Etymology: Greek ‘opti’ (from optikós, equivalent to opt(ós) - seen ) + ‘paronomasía’ (a play on words, assonance, derivative of paronomázein - to make a slight name-change).

[Nabhan Abdullatif]

micdotcom

bobbycaputo:

Intimate, First Person Views of North Korea Captured on Google Glass

While Google Glass user Kenny Zhu was in North Korea this past April, he took advantage of the small and comparatively inconspicuous size of the device on his head to snap what appear to be the first images taken in North Korea using the wearable tech.

The images themselves aren’t too far out of the ordinary from other photos we’ve seen out of DPRK, but this first-person view gives viewers a more personal look at what it’s like to visit the mysterious country.

As for how DPRK authorities allowed Zhu to use the device, he told CNN the following:

At the first sight they were able to tell it is a photography device. But without Internet — no Internet service available for temporary foreign visitors in North Korea — the glasses are just a wearable video camera. They were suspicious of the Google Glass at first though, asking me some questions about it — how does it work, what does it do, etc. I let them played around with it and they seemed flattered and inquired no more.

(Continue Reading)

Marvin minsky once said “if you understand something in only one way, then you don’t understand it at all. The secret of what anything means to us depends on how we’ve connected it to all other things we know”